Kill Bill Use Cases

Groupon – Online Business as a Daily Discount Provider

Through its website, Groupon offers its customers discounts on both products and services. Based in the U.S., it also operates in over a dozen other countries. During Q4 2019, Groupon had 43.6 million active customers and billed $1.2 billion globally.

Groupon needs to process payments in multiple currencies and accept a number of different payment methods (credit and debit cards, online money transfers, SMS, and card present solutions, etc.). Additionally, it interacts with a variety of payment gateways and supports different payment flows (hosted payment pages, third-party API integrations, 3D Secure verification, etc.).

SureVoIP – VoIP Telecommunications Provider

SureVoIP provides its United Kingdom customers with VoIP business solutions and products. Customers can subscribe to hosted VoIP and choose features like fax-to-email, call forwarding, and conferencing. New customers receive a 14-day free trial of SureVoIP services.

SureVoIP looked for a feature-rich billing system to support its 14-day trial period and the variety of service plans it offered (which are billed by usage minutes). The ability to bill for add-ons (minute bundling, number porting, and international numbers) was also key. The fact that Kill Bill was open-source with an active, helpful community was another reason they chose Kill Bill.

Company A – Technology solutions provider for hospitality and food service industries

Company A provides a suite of SaaS solutions that range from booking software to point-of-sale to staff management. They initially planned to build a subscription billing system from scratch. 

However, they soon found Kill Bill and realized it was faster and more economical to implement it than building a new billing system. Adding weight to their decision was the fact that Kill Bill is open-source, extensible, and has proven itself for ten years across hundreds of implementations.

Currently, their Accounting department uses Kill Bill to manage usage-based billing for one of its SaaS applications. Later, they plan to extend Kill Bill’s use to its full suite of SaaS applications.

Company B – SaaS Startup with Software Development Tool

Company B has a SaaS product that helps software developers quickly deploy their apps onto iOS and Android devices. Although the base features are free to use, the SaaS product also includes three levels of paid plans. Each plan includes access to more features and allowances, such as the number of installations allowed per app, maximum upload size, and so forth. 

Company B uses Kill Bill to bill customers monthly. Customers can also purchase add-ons, such as customized installation links, increased file upload sizes, and extended life of installation links.

Company C – SaaS Company for Building Community and Social Websites

Company C has three levels of paid plans for its tens of thousands of customers to subscribe to. The available features are nearly identical across the plans. However, the higher levels allow more members, online storage space, and technical support. The highest plan level allows users to purchase add-ons, such as widgets, plugins, and integration options.

Like many online SaaS businesses, Company C gives its new users a 14-day free trial of its software. Also quite common, subscribers who pay a year in advance receive a discount on the annual fee. 

Company C looked for a subscription billing system to support the trial period, subscriptions plans, and add-ons. Before migrating to Kill Bill, they had subscribed to a popular, leading billing system. However, they needed more flexibility, particularly to test different pricing structures to optimize their revenue stream. They also needed analytical reports that allowed them to customize the report metrics so they could assess the effectiveness of its payment plan tests.